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Posted by on in Discrimination
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Discrimination through favouritism still prevalent in the workplace

A study carried out by the Employers Forum on Age (EFA) has shown that 16% of workers feel that favouritism in the workplace has led to them being discriminated against when applying for a job or promotion at some point in their career.

 

In total 35% of respondents felt they have been discriminated against when trying to move company or applying for a more senior position in the same company. Age is the most common reason (17%), closely followed by favouritism/the other candidate fitting the company’s ‘personality’ better (16%). Workers in the North were most likely to feel they had fallen victim to favouritism, with 22% in the North East and 19% in the North West believing that they had been discriminated against for this reason, compared to 11% in Northern Ireland and 12% in the South West.

 

The study also found that almost two thirds (62%) of employees said that all, most or some of their colleagues are similar to them. When asked what it is they had in common with their co-workers, age was found to be the most common factor (68%), followed by gender (62%) and social background (53%).

 

Workplaces in Yorkshire and Humber were found to be the least varied, with only 25% of respondents claiming to bear no similarity to any of their colleagues, while there was greater than average diversity in the East Midlands, Northern Ireland, London and East of England (32%). In addition, unconscious bias in the private sector is more prevalent than the public sector with 29% vs 35% respectively saying they felt part of a very varied workplace.

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